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Curriculum – Psychology

Why Study A Level Psychology?

Psychology is the study of human behaviour. It applies the principles of both science and humanities in trying to explain why people why people behave in certain ways. Studying Psychology involves understanding research and the explanations that have been developed from it. Examples of behaviour that will be studied will include: obedience, prejudice, memory, phobias and aggression. In Y13 students will also look at Clinical Psychology and Child Development as well as wider issues in Psychology.

 

A level Edexcel Course Content

The course followed provides an overview of the major influences on human behaviour. You will study four main Psychological approaches: Social, Cognitive, Learning and Biological. In addition, you will study Key issues and debates in Psychology. In each of these topics, students will examine psychological theories and research methods

Following on from this, course focuses upon the application of psychological theories and research to the real world. Students will study the compulsory topics of Clinical Psychology and Child Psychology.

The Psychology course is examined by a mixture of question styles including short and extended questions and stimulus data response. The two-year the course is assessed by 3, 2-hour examinations. Paper 1 (Foundations in Psychology), Paper 2 (Applications in Psychology) and Paper 3 (Psychological Skills).

A qualification in Psychology is particularly useful for jobs involving the leadership of others or the shaping of others’ behaviour e.g. counselling, psychiatry, child therapy, teaching, policing, forensic science, prison service ,human resources, advertising, journalism and tech.

Examination Board: Edexcel

Disclaimer: The information on this page is to be used as guidance only. The course availability and content is subject to change based on demand and time-tabling.

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